Cats health. Parasites

There are a number of parasites that can affect cats, including ticks, fleas and lice. While some of these parasites are relatively harmless, others can cause serious health problems. It is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of parasitic infestation in cats, and to take steps to protect your pet from these pests.

Ticks in cats

Ticks are small arachnids that attach themselves to the skin of their host and feed on blood. There are many different types of ticks, but the most common ones found on cats are the deer tick, American dog tick, and brown dog tick. They can transmit a number of diseases, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and ehrlichiosis. Ticks are most commonly found in areas where there is tall grass or woodland, but they can also be found in suburban and urban areas.

Ticks in cats

Ticks in cats

Symptoms of Tick Infestation
Symptoms of tick-borne diseases vary depending on the particular disease involved, but may include fever, muscle pain, lethargy or lack of energy, swollen lymph nodes, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, rash and seizures. Cats with tick-borne diseases may also have difficulty breathing. Tick bites themselves often do not cause any symptoms, so it is important to check your cat regularly for ticks.

Causes of Tick Infestations
The main causes of tick infestations in cats are exposure to areas where ticks live (e.g., woods or tall grass) and contact with other animals that carry ticks (e.g., dogs). Cats who spend time outdoors are more likely to get ticks than indoor-only cats. Pets who roam freely outside or those who go hunting or hiking with their owners are especially at risk for getting bitten.
If you have an outdoor cat, it is important to keep him well groomed so that you can spot any attached ticks before they spread infection. You should also check your pet’s bedding regularly for signs of fleas or ticks.

Diagnosis & Treatment
The most common way to prevent tick-borne diseases is to keep your cat away from areas where ticks are likely to be present. There are also several types of tick repellents available over the counter, which you can use on your cat if needed. If you suspect that your cat has been infected with a tick-borne disease, take him or her to see a veterinarian as soon as possible for diagnosis and treatment
If your veterinarian suspects that your cat has been infected with one of these diseases, he will perform some tests such as blood work and/or a spinal test . Most cases can be treated successfully with antibiotics if caught early, but some infections can be fatal if left untreated

Fleas in cats

Fleas are tiny, blood-sucking parasites that can cause a lot of problems for cats. They are one of the most common parasites found in cats, and can cause everything from skin irritation to serious diseases.

Fleas in cats

Fleas are very small black or brown bugs that feed on the blood of mammals. They attach themselves to a host by biting them and sucking their blood. Fleas can be found on any part of a cat’s body, but they are especially common around the neck and head area. Cats may scratch or lick themselves excessively if they have fleas because they often feel itchy. Other symptoms include hair loss, redness and inflammation around the bite site, lethargy and weight loss.
The most common way to get fleas is through contact with an infected animal – usually another pet such as a dog or cat – but they can also be spread through contact with contaminated surfaces such as bedding or furniture. Flea eggs hatch into larvae which live in cracks and crevices until they mature into adult fleas, which then start feeding on blood again.

A veterinarian will perform a physical examination to look for any external evidence of fleas such as bites or scratch marks. He may also use a magnifying lens to look for black specs on your cat’s coat, which indicate that he is currently hosting these parasites. If your cat is diagnosed with fleas, he will likely prescribe a topical treatment like Advantage Multi® which kills adult fleas before they can lay eggs; oral medications like fiprofort plus for cats, Program® which prevents immature forms called larvae from developing into adult fleas; Revolution® which kills both adult fleas and larvaE; or Capstar ™ which quickly eliminates all adult fleas present on your pet within hours but should only be used when there is no risk of pregnant females being exposed to it.

Lice in cats

Lice are tiny insects that live in the hair and fur of animals. They feed on blood and can cause significant irritation and discomfort for their hosts. Cats can get lice from other animals, such as dogs or raccoons, or from contact with infected bedding, furniture, or clothing. Lice infestations are most common in young kittens and outdoor cats, who may have more exposure to other animals.
Symptoms of lice infestation in cats include excessive scratching, biting at the skin around the head and neck, hair loss, reddened skin patches where parasites are feeding on blood vessels close to the surface of the skin (known as exsanguination),and overall poor appearance caused by excessive scratching and licking.

Lice in cats

Lice in cats

The most common way to diagnose a cat with lice is through visual inspection – looking for live lice or eggs (nits) attached to hairs near the scalp. Other tests may also be performed if there is suspicion of an underlying infection, such as mange caused by mites (a different type of parasitic insect). Treatment for a cat with lice generally involves using a topical medication prescribed by your veterinarian, which will kill both adult lice and eggs/nits, so they don’t hatch and re-infest your pet later on. Some examples of these medications include permethrin shampoo/cream rinse; pyrethrin spray; imidacloprid dip; malathion lotion/spray; selamectin injection/topical solution

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

petsterest.com
Logo
Enable registration in settings - general
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0
Shopping cart